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Practice Makes Perfect- But What If There Is NO Practice?

(Last Updated On: February 11, 2020)

The 10-20-70 model says that 10% of learning comes from formal training, 20% comes from social interactions, and 70% comes from learning and practice on the job. Traditional classroom training provides general knowledge. If it is a participatory training program, there are group discussions and activities which provide the necessary social interactions for 20% of learning.

What About the Remaining 70%?

Where traditional training fails is in the area of the 70% practice on the job. There may be practice during the training, but there is no reinforcement or incentive to practice new skills after the training program is over. And, without immediate focused practice, there is no retention and no performance improvement.

There are four key reasons why practice ends at the close of a traditional management development workshop.

First, the content of traditional training is often general and conceptual rather than specific and practical. It may be difficult for the managers to decide how the content applies to their particular circumstances.

Second, many traditional workshop are several days long, during which time the managers’ work piles up. The need to jump back into their work world means that they place practice on the back burner.

Third, the cost of management training, particularly off-site programs, may be such that not all managers may attend the training program. So, the participating managers may not have the necessary peer support or shared vocabulary to try new things once they are back on the job.

Fourth, although participants may practice new skills for the duration of formal training, there is hardly sufficient time to build their confidence in their own capability to use the new skills.

Whatever the reason, the newly learned knowledge and skills are rarely applied, and, because of that, they are quickly forgotten.

Filling the 70% Learning Gap

Peer learning, using small groups of managers who meet onsite for two sessions separated by a month of practice, overcomes these drawbacks.

Unlike in traditional training, the managers discuss current management challenges in structured, self-directed and, therefore, confidential sessions. They can share their concerns as well as their expertise, while they learn new techniques from prepared materials.

The sessions are only 90 minutes, held onsite and scheduled at the managers’ convenience. As a result, there is little time away from their offices.

Peer learning groups are very reasonably priced, so, all managers can participate. They share the same vocabulary and can support each other as they practice new behaviors.

The month of practice that immediately follows the first peer learning group session provides sufficient time so the managers can build confidence in their capability.

The managers’ practice is reinforced in six ways: (1) Each manager chooses a peer buddy with whom to check in once a week to discuss progress; (2) Microlearning tips are sent out weekly to remind the managers of key concepts and skills; (3) The managers keep a simple log of events, which will help them when they debrief their experience during the second session; (4) The manager has made a commitment, which s/he may feel honor-bound to fulfill; (5) There is peer pressure from the other group members to actively practice what the manager committed to do at the end of the first session; and (6) The fact that they will be reporting their experience to the other group members during the second session also provides an impetus to practice.

Peer Learning Groups

The discussions in the peer learning groups effectively provide the socially interactive learning component, or 20% of the 10-20-70 model. The 70% is provided by learning and practice on the job.

Because of their emphasis on practice, peer learning groups can stand alone- or they can be leveraged to extend the learning that occurs in the more traditional training programs that the managers attend.

Make Practice in the Flow of Work a Reality

It is said that practice makes perfect. It stands to reason that no practice means no change in behavior. The intention of any management development program is to facilitate a positive change in behavior, so the manager is more effective. Peer learning groups are specifically designed to accomplish that goal due to the month of practice.

Schedule a call with one of our training specialists to see how peer learning groups can strengthen your management development program: https://calendly.com/peerlearninginstitute/discoverycall

 

Deborah Laurel, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer

The Peer Learning Institute

Welcome

 

 

Peer learning, using small groups of managers who meet onsite for two sessions separated by a month of practice, overcomes these drawbacks.

 

Unlike in traditional training, the managers discuss current management challenges in structured, self-directed and, therefore, confidential sessions. They can share their concerns as well as their expertise, while they learn new techniques from prepared materials.

 

The sessions are only 90 minutes, held onsite and scheduled at the managers’ convenience. As a result, there is little time away from their offices.

 

Peer learning groups are very reasonably priced, so, all managers can participate.

They share the same vocabulary and can support each other as they practice new behaviors.

 

The month of practice that immediately follows the first peer learning group session provides sufficient time so the managers can build confidence in their capability.

 

The managers’ practice is reinforced in six ways: (1) Each manager chooses a peer buddy with whom to check in once a week to discuss progress; (2) Microlearning tips are sent out weekly to remind the managers of key concepts and skills; (3) The managers keep a simple log of events, which will help them when they debrief their experience during the second session;

 

(4) The manager has made a commitment, which s/he may feel honor-bound to fulfill; (5) There is peer pressure from the other group members to actively practice what the manager committed to do at the end of the first session; and (6) The fact that they will be reporting their experience to the other group members during the second session also provides an impetus to practice.

 

Peer Learning Groups

 

The discussions in the peer learning groups effectively provide the socially interactive learning component, or 20% of the 10-20-70 model. The 70% is provided by learning and practice on the job.

 

Because of their emphasis on practice, peer learning groups can stand alone- or they can be leveraged to extend the learning that occurs in the more traditional training programs that the managers attend.

 

Make Practice in the Flow of Work a Reality

 

It is said that practice makes perfect. It stands to reason that no practice means no change in behavior. The intention of any management development program is to facilitate a positive change in behavior, so the manager is more effective. Peer learning groups are specifically designed to accomplish that goal due to the month of practice.

 

Schedule a call with one of our training specialists to see how peer learning groups can strengthen your management development program:

https://calendly.com/peerlearninginstitute/discoverycall

 

Deborah Laurel, Co-Founder and Chief Learning Officer

The Peer Learning Institute

Welcome

 

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